San Millán Yuso and Suso Monasteries

After a day footling around in Burgos, which including deciding not to go and visit a nearby archaeological world heritage site, I went back to Logrono and took a trip out into the country to see these two monasteries.

Suso monastery

Suso monastery

 They are both dedicated to San Millan, a shepherd turned monk who lived in the 6th century when Yuso, the earliest of the two monasteries was founded, based around caves in which anchorites lived. A bus takes visitors up the hill to see what is left of it, which isn’t much. Just the walls of the church with a modern roof on for protection. It was extended a few times and has Visigoth, Mozarabic (10th century Moorish style) and Romanesque elements. Some of the caves open off the church, one of them the original burial place of the saint, before he was moved down to Yuso.

Yuso monastery, just down the hill, was built in the 11th century but the present building is Renaissance and is still a monastery, albeit with a rather posh looking hotel attached. One of the reasons for the UN listing of the site is the presence in the library of the earliest known written examples of the Castilian and Basque languages, in both cases as marginal annotations by monks on Latin texts.

Yuso monastery - entrance

Yuso monastery - entrance

To be honest, neither is amazingly impressive to look at (not when you’ve seen as much as I have this last month) although it does have a jolly decorative sacristy:

Yuso monastery - sacristy

Yuso monastery - sacristy

As I was leaving for the bus, I took this photograph of the side of the monastery church.

Yuso monastery

Yuso monastery

And that is what I chose for the Lego rendering:

Lego Yuso monastery

Lego Yuso monastery

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2 Responses to San Millán Yuso and Suso Monasteries

  1. deborahrs says:

    Did you get to see the library and the books?????

    • Jax says:

      No, sadly the library wasn’t on the tour. We got to see a facsimile of the famous annotations although the excitement was rather lost on me, not being a Spanish speaker in any of its forms.

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