San Agustín Archaeological Park

I had tentatively planned to take a bus north from Ecuador to Colombia but changed my mind a couple of days beforehand and flew instead. This was partly because southern Colombia is rather scary and partly because it was going to be a very long journey.

San Agustin

San Agustin

So I flew via Bogata to Popayan, from where the six-hour bus ride over an unmade road (so bumpy in places that we were bounced right out of our seats) departs. Our bus sustained a puncture en route, so we spent an extra hour watching the driver and his mate change the wheel.

San Agustin

San Agustin

The archaeological remains in this area date from the first to eighth centuries and mostly comprise megalithic sculptures accompanying stone-lined tombs in earth mounds on man-made terraces.

San Agustin

San Agustin

The most important tombs have groups of statues fronting the tomb chamber, once covered by the earth mound by now partially visible, with the roofing stones balancing on top of the wall ones.

There is also a group of carved rocks in a stream bed, although they are so worn that is was impossible for me to take a photograph that actually shows the carvings.

San Agustin - Fuente de Lavapatas

San Agustin - Fuente de Lavapatas

The sculptures range from the human, through humanoid (possibly gods) to the animal.

 

San Agustin

San Agustin

 

Many of the sculptures have become separated from their original context over the centuries so the park has collected a group of them together on an attractive forest walk.

San Agustin

San Agustin

As the chief attraction of this site is the sculpture, I wasn’t too sure how to depict it in Lego, but in the end went for a tomb with three figures in front. The figures are what I have and come under the heading of artistic licence.

Lego San Agustin

Lego San Agustin

I was in San Agustin on New Year’s Eve. The town celebrates by spending the day throwing flour at each other. With so few changes of clothes I didn’t dare venture into the melee, but I did see the aftermath, both in terms of the people and the town centre later. Both were covered.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Lego, UN World Heritage Site and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s